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Cirrhosis | Cirrhosis Patients Losing Muscle Mass Have A Higher Death Rate

Contact: Raquel Maurier
raquel.maurier@ualberta.ca
780-492-5986
University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine Dentistry
Cirrhosis patients losing muscle mass have a higher death rate These patients should be bumped up on liver transplant lists

Medical researchers at the University of Alberta reviewed the medical records of more than 100 patients who had a liver scarring condition and discovered those who were losing muscle were more apt to die while waiting for a liver transplant. These cirrhosis patients were placed at a lower spot on the transplant list because they had a higher functioning liver and were seemingly less sick than others with the same condition, based on scoring systems physicians commonly use today.

Michael Sawyer, the principal investigator in the recently published review, says the results demonstrate physicians need to consider muscle mass when assessing where a patient with cirrhosis needs to be placed on the transplant list. Muscle mass, which can be seen through CT images commonly ordered for cirrhosis patients, needs to be considered in conjunction with other factors doctors currently look at, says Sawyer, who is a researcher in the Department of Oncology with the Faculty of Medicine Dentistry and a practising oncologist at the Cross Cancer Institute.


The review conducted by Sawyer and his colleagues was just published in the peer-reviewed journal, Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology , in the United States. An editorial about this research was also published in the February issue of the journal.

Sawyer and his team studied 112 patients with cirrhosis who were awaiting liver transplants at the University of Alberta Hospital and discovered 40 per cent of them had muscle wasting or low muscle mass. Cirrhosis is the final phase of chronic liver diseases, characterized by scarring of the liver and poor liver function. Those with low muscle mass lived for about 19 months if they couldn’t get a transplant, while those with normal muscle mass lived for about 34 months without a liver transplant.

“Patients with cirrhosis who have low muscle mass are actually more sick than what current scoring systems are telling us and many of them die while waiting on the liver transplant lists,” says Sawyer.


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